Recovering Leadership


Image

Who is benefiting from your leadership—you, or the people you serve?

Are you obsessed about and feel the need to control every situation?

Do you feel a constant need to achieve or win?

These are signs of an “addict leader,” which often involves using power, success, and control as a type of “drug,” much the way substance addicts use their drugs. While not as immediately destructive as drug or alcohol abuse, addict leaders exhibit addictive and controlling behaviors that ultimately damage themselves and the people around them. As with all addictions, addict leadership left unchecked will lead to death—including death of relationships and culture.

Recovering Leadership is the story of an addict leader who reached a dead end and had to find a new way to live and work. In his recovery, and in the recovery of the organization he leads, Thomas Hill learned where his real value comes from and how to properly value and care for others.

Thomas’s story is personal, but it is also corporate. Just as people have unmanageable belief systems and lives, organizations often have toxic cultures that suck the life out of their team members. Recovering Leadership offers practical insight into creating a positive workplace culture where people find meaning and connection in their work and relationships. As a recovering leader, Thomas is committed to this new culture—a new life if you will—that is energizing, healthy, and purposeful.

In recovery, people share their stories to help others in their recovery and to remind themselves of the way things were, what happened, and the way things are now. Through the true and inspiring message of Recovering Leadership, readers are invited to evaluate their own beliefs and behaviors so they can open a door of recovery for themselves and the people they lead. 

Image

Thomas Hill III


Thomas Hill III is chief executive officer of Kimray, Inc. As the grandson of Kimray’s founder, Garman Kimmell, Thomas grew up around the family business and manages the family-owned company with a sense of stewardship and heritage.

In 1948, Kimray revolutionized pressure regulation in the oil and gas industry by introducing a three-inch pilot-operated gas back-pressure regulator. The company has since grown to be a globally-known manufacturer of a comprehensive line of reliable, smart, and inventive American-made control equipment for safely and efficiently producing oil and gas. Having worked in virtually every department, Thomas has an intimate knowledge of the processes and people involved from start to finish.

Thomas earned a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering at Oklahoma State University. He and his wife have been married for over 30 years and have six children. When he is not doing something with his family, working at Kimray, or sharing his story with others, you will find Thomas reading and writing, collecting LAMY fountain pens, and learning something about everything.

Thomas grew up in a high-performing family, which shaped his belief that people are worth what they can accomplish. This sent Thomas on a long and unfulfilling journey of pursuing success by constantly doing bigger and better things. Life eventually spun out of control, and Thomas reached a dead end. Unfortunately, this meant Kimray hit rock bottom at the same time.

Thomas’s story does not end there. Through significant pain and loss, he began the long and difficult road of recovery that transformed his life and leadership. Today, Thomas enjoys sharing his story with others who can benefit from the lessons he has learned. He is committed to carrying the message of Recovering Leadership to other “addict leaders” and practicing these principles in daily life.

 

Speaking Topics

Recovering Leadership:
Creating a healthy, purposeful, and energizing workplace culture

 

Testimonials

 

“Thomas Hill is a student and faculty favorite to speak at our Liberal Arts leadership class on the campus of Oklahoma State University—Oklahoma City. We have been fortunate to have him in our class multiple times and listen to his amazing leadership story as it unfolds.”

Robin A. Scott, Professor, Oklahoma State University—Oklahoma City

"Thomas's transparent articulation of his journey stands as a model to the real-life confrontation with challenge and transformation towards ethics of one of our community leaders. His story is a living example of action, failure, and reorientation that models ethics in our state. Thank you OK Ethics for inviting him to share his story with our city and state!"

Brent La Vigne, Vice President of University Relations, Southern Nazarene University

"The message was so very inspiring. It resonated with me from so many different perspectives but primarily from the perspective of' Am I doing all that I can to influence character and integrity at the top of our organization?' Even days after the presentation I found myself changing processes and procedures in order to demonstrate our commitment to treating others with dignity and respect regardless of their situation. My batteries were recharged!!! I'm committing myself to do more to influence character and integrity from the top down."

Bill Turner, Vice President of Human Resources, Valir Health

"I believe Mr. Hill is the first speaker who has stated that all people have intrinsic value. I love that! I still have a lump in my throat. If everyone believed that with all of their hearts, what a wonderful world this would be. As a person who doesn't fit the stereotypical "all that" description, it was heartwarming to hear such respect for all life. I hope Mr. Hill speaks again soon!"

Anonymous

"I found that the presentation really gave me things to think about. Thomas Hill is an excellent storyteller, and I am excited to read the book. I'm glad we went!"

– Pam Mowry

"Excellent presentation - was blown away by his transparency."

–Anonymous

"I most especially enjoyed Thomas' integrity in sharing his personal journey; he certainly did not attempt to glamorize it! A couple of take-away that reinforced my personal beliefs and values: I) People are intrinsically valuable; 2) Changes must be transformative, not tactical. I have already shared most of his key points with other team members."

–Anonymous

 

Videos